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A Physical Understanding of Race Car Handling

Know the Tyres.  Feel the Rotation. New insights into race car handling and the driver's relationship with the ...

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Suspension Tuning 101 and 102

In this free training, Suspension Tuning 101 and 102, we give you a complete run down on how you can do the suspensio...

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Bump Steer Made Easy

"Bump Steer Made Easy" show you how to measure bump steer accurately, using only a single point laser you can buy fro...

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Get More Grip and Better Balance

CLUED UP RACERS NOW USING THIS SIMPLE BLUEPRINT TO SLICE SECONDS FROM THEIR LAP TIME... Full instruction in what you...

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The Co-Founders of Racing Car Technology are Dale Thompson and Neville Smith. They have been involved in racing since their teenage years in the 1960s. In earlier times, there was little knowledge about handling of the race car. It was pretty much a black box. In the late 90s, they formed Racing Car Technology, a business offering workshop set-up services for race cars. By now, there was new information about race car handling that helped them develop new procedures. After a set-up, they would test at the race track. They proved the cars were faster. From the beginning, the calculations in the Racing Car Technology Weight Transfer Worksheet™ were central. It was possible to do the set-up in the workshop, and then go to the track knowing that you had a good baseline set-up for grip and balance.

The slip angles at the tyres are key to understanding handling. In fact, with no slip angles, the car would be uncontrollable at speeds anything much above 20 kph. Due to the tyre slip angles, the car adopts a slightly "nose in" attitude relative to the actual direction of travel of the vehicle. The measured attitude angle at the centre of gravity is known as the vehicle "Body Slip Angle". In the mid corner phase, we have so-called "Steady State Cornering". The Body slip Angle is fixed. There is no rotation of the vehicle around it's own vertical axis. However, in corner entry and exit, there is a net rotation, turning the car further into the corner on corner entry, and turning the car out of the corner on corner exit. The driver feels these rotations of the chassis on the tyres, as the tyres stay gripping the road. This is the "seat of the pants feeling" that drivers talk about.

Calculate Springs and Anti-roll Bars